The Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine

Constantine's return to Rome was a long, bloody path. His army had marched and fought it's way through all of northern Italy. The last battle that stood in his way was waged north of Rome at a temporary bridge on the Tiber. There, it was prophesied that the enemy of the Romans would die.

On the way to the battle, Constantine is said to have had a vision that, if they drew Christian symbols on their shields, they would be assured of victory. They used the symbols and they won. Maxentius, the loser of the battle, drowned in the Tiber. His body was fished out of the river, beheaded and paraded around Rome. Just for good measure, his headless body was then sent to Carthage as a polite reminder that there was a new boss.

in 315, to celebrate Constantine's victory at the Battle of Milvian Bridge and his return to Rome, this arch was built on the Via Triumphalis right next to the Colosseum. It is the newest of the triumphal arches in Rome. Being the youngest has it's benefits: it is partially constructed from parts of other monuments while managing to avoid being used for parts itself.

This photo is taken through one of the archways of the Colosseum looking towards the Palatine Hill.

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EXIF

Camera: NIKON D80
Lens Type: 18.0-105.0 mm f/3.5-5.6
Focal Length: 22 mm
35mm Focal Length: 33 mm
Exposure: 1/125 sec
Aperture: f 8
ISO: 250
Views: 2959
Taken: 2009-05-25 06:19:09
Posted: 2011-01-24 | 12:08





The Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine

Constantine's return to Rome was a long, bloody path. His army had marched and fought it's way through all of northern Italy. The last battle that stood in his way was waged north of Rome at a temporary bridge on the Tiber. There, it was prophesied that the enemy of the Romans would die.

On the way to the battle, Constantine is said to have had a vision that, if they drew Christian symbols on their shields, they would be assured of victory. They used the symbols and they won. Maxentius, the loser of the battle, drowned in the Tiber. His body was fished out of the river, beheaded and paraded around Rome. Just for good measure, his headless body was then sent to Carthage as a polite reminder that there was a new boss.

in 315, to celebrate Constantine's victory at the Battle of Milvian Bridge and his return to Rome, this arch was built on the Via Triumphalis right next to the Colosseum. It is the newest of the triumphal arches in Rome. Being the youngest has it's benefits: it is partially constructed from parts of other monuments while managing to avoid being used for parts itself.

This photo is taken through one of the archways of the Colosseum looking towards the Palatine Hill.

show this photo on a map ✈

Tags & Categories


EXIF

Camera: NIKON D80
Lens Type: 18.0-105.0 mm f/3.5-5.6
Focal Length: 22 mm
35mm Focal Length: 33 mm
Exposure: 1/125 sec
Aperture: f 8
ISO: 250
Views: 2959
Taken: 2009-05-25 06:19:09
Posted: 2011-01-24 | 12:08