The Rape of Polyxena

The Rape of Polyxena

We remember Achilles as a great hero and, this is very important for a soldier, the most handsome of those warring with Troy. We tend to forget that he killed two of Polyxena's brothers as well as enslaving her and ultimately having her killed. Heroes. They're so wanton.

In this statue by Pio Fedi, she is struggling to get away from him while he easily contains her in one arm. The other arm? Well, with that one he's about to strike down her mother, Hecuba, with his mighty sword. You can just see her head peeking past his leg. He doesn't kill her though. According to Dante, the mother's ultimate fate was insanity. She began to bark like a dog. I'm not really sure what her problem was. Sure she lost a few children but she'd had nineteen. Achilles somehow restrained himself so that he only killed three of her children and not three children and the mother.

Polyxena did get her revenge for the death of her two brothers. Achilles had told her in confidence his weakness: when he was dipped in the river Styx, which was supposed to make him immortal, his heel was not submerged thus making it vulnerable. Polyxena told Paris, yet another brother, and Paris ambushed the hero Achilles, shooting him in the heel with a poisoned arrow and sealing his fate.

Not terribly impressed by her betrayal, he came back as a ghost and stated that for the Greek ships to be able to return, she must be sacrificed so that there would be wind to fill the boat's sails.

I love happy endings.

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EXIF

Camera: NIKON D80
Lens Type:
Focal Length: 80 mm
35mm Focal Length: 120 mm
Exposure: 1/100 sec
Aperture: f 8
ISO: 800
Views: 8817
Taken: 2009-05-24 16:36:29
Posted: 2011-02-15 | 07:25





The Rape of Polyxena

The Rape of Polyxena

We remember Achilles as a great hero and, this is very important for a soldier, the most handsome of those warring with Troy. We tend to forget that he killed two of Polyxena's brothers as well as enslaving her and ultimately having her killed. Heroes. They're so wanton.

In this statue by Pio Fedi, she is struggling to get away from him while he easily contains her in one arm. The other arm? Well, with that one he's about to strike down her mother, Hecuba, with his mighty sword. You can just see her head peeking past his leg. He doesn't kill her though. According to Dante, the mother's ultimate fate was insanity. She began to bark like a dog. I'm not really sure what her problem was. Sure she lost a few children but she'd had nineteen. Achilles somehow restrained himself so that he only killed three of her children and not three children and the mother.

Polyxena did get her revenge for the death of her two brothers. Achilles had told her in confidence his weakness: when he was dipped in the river Styx, which was supposed to make him immortal, his heel was not submerged thus making it vulnerable. Polyxena told Paris, yet another brother, and Paris ambushed the hero Achilles, shooting him in the heel with a poisoned arrow and sealing his fate.

Not terribly impressed by her betrayal, he came back as a ghost and stated that for the Greek ships to be able to return, she must be sacrificed so that there would be wind to fill the boat's sails.

I love happy endings.

show this photo on a map ✈

Tags & Categories


EXIF

Camera: NIKON D80
Lens Type:
Focal Length: 80 mm
35mm Focal Length: 120 mm
Exposure: 1/100 sec
Aperture: f 8
ISO: 800
Views: 8817
Taken: 2009-05-24 16:36:29
Posted: 2011-02-15 | 07:25