Porsche 356 SL

Porsche 356 SL

This is the first Porsche to have raced at Le Mans and, even more interesting, it's the first car to ever race under the Porsche name. That was in 1951 and the car took first place in the 1100cc class and 20th overall.

1100cc isn't exactly a large engine and it output all of 60hp. That number is so ridiculously small now that it's hard to imagine that a company as famous for racing as Porsche is ever fielded a car with such little power.

They did, and they won.

We went to the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart a few weeks ago and what an amazing place it is. The architecture of the new museum is very, very cool and there are about eighty cars there with interactive displays and, best of all, a very liberal photography policy. If you are a long time viewer of this blog (are there any?) you might remember some of my anti-car rants and they still apply but to actually visit the Porsche museum and see the factory buildings surrounding it is a bit of a childhood dream of mine. As a kid, I loved auto racing. Before there ever were 24 hour sports stations, let alone 24 hour motor sports stations, I was catching compressed versions of the 24 hours of Le Mans on the Wild World of Sports. I remember watching the first flag to flag TV coverage of the Daytona 500. I'd scan the TV section of the paper for Formula One races. Looking at my school books from grade one and two all you can see are pictures I drew of race cars and little, disjointed, six-year-old-kid stories of watching the races on TV.

It was, beyond a doubt, what I wanted to be when I grew up.

But then I grew up. I don't even own a car anymore. I haven't needed one for maybe ten years. That didn't prevent me from visiting a museum that, as far as I am concerned, is full of childhood treasure. And it really is. Beautiful, sexy, historic, classic cars. I won't list them here - I'll roll the stories out as I post more photos from the museum - but it really is a fantastic collection. Race cars I watched as a child or read about in magazines were sitting there right in front of me. Legendary cars that never, ever could be brought to North America↩. And I could photograph them all I wanted.

As a child, if you had told me that, one morning, on a whim, I would be able to get on the famous autobahn (we took my girlfriend's car. I know, I know) and end up in Zuffenhausen staring at all of the buildings with giant Porsche lettering on them I never would have believed you.

Some dreams do come true.

For the record, I'm not old enough to remember the racing 356s thank you very much. Not by a long shot.

↩ Now the US has created a special category for the importation of some exotic collector cars that allows for showing them and a tiny bit of driving. Cars like the Porsche 959. I'm not sure what Canada's position on them is.

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EXIF

Camera: NIKON D90
Lens Type:
Focal Length: 24 mm
35mm Focal Length: 36 mm
Exposure: 1/40 sec
Aperture: f 4.5
ISO: 200
Views: 2302
Taken: 2011-03-05 16:00:07
Posted: 2011-04-26 | 09:34





Porsche 356 SL

Porsche 356 SL

This is the first Porsche to have raced at Le Mans and, even more interesting, it's the first car to ever race under the Porsche name. That was in 1951 and the car took first place in the 1100cc class and 20th overall.

1100cc isn't exactly a large engine and it output all of 60hp. That number is so ridiculously small now that it's hard to imagine that a company as famous for racing as Porsche is ever fielded a car with such little power.

They did, and they won.

We went to the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart a few weeks ago and what an amazing place it is. The architecture of the new museum is very, very cool and there are about eighty cars there with interactive displays and, best of all, a very liberal photography policy. If you are a long time viewer of this blog (are there any?) you might remember some of my anti-car rants and they still apply but to actually visit the Porsche museum and see the factory buildings surrounding it is a bit of a childhood dream of mine. As a kid, I loved auto racing. Before there ever were 24 hour sports stations, let alone 24 hour motor sports stations, I was catching compressed versions of the 24 hours of Le Mans on the Wild World of Sports. I remember watching the first flag to flag TV coverage of the Daytona 500. I'd scan the TV section of the paper for Formula One races. Looking at my school books from grade one and two all you can see are pictures I drew of race cars and little, disjointed, six-year-old-kid stories of watching the races on TV.

It was, beyond a doubt, what I wanted to be when I grew up.

But then I grew up. I don't even own a car anymore. I haven't needed one for maybe ten years. That didn't prevent me from visiting a museum that, as far as I am concerned, is full of childhood treasure. And it really is. Beautiful, sexy, historic, classic cars. I won't list them here - I'll roll the stories out as I post more photos from the museum - but it really is a fantastic collection. Race cars I watched as a child or read about in magazines were sitting there right in front of me. Legendary cars that never, ever could be brought to North America↩. And I could photograph them all I wanted.

As a child, if you had told me that, one morning, on a whim, I would be able to get on the famous autobahn (we took my girlfriend's car. I know, I know) and end up in Zuffenhausen staring at all of the buildings with giant Porsche lettering on them I never would have believed you.

Some dreams do come true.

For the record, I'm not old enough to remember the racing 356s thank you very much. Not by a long shot.

↩ Now the US has created a special category for the importation of some exotic collector cars that allows for showing them and a tiny bit of driving. Cars like the Porsche 959. I'm not sure what Canada's position on them is.

show this photo on a map ✈

Tags & Categories


EXIF

Camera: NIKON D90
Lens Type:
Focal Length: 24 mm
35mm Focal Length: 36 mm
Exposure: 1/40 sec
Aperture: f 4.5
ISO: 200
Views: 2302
Taken: 2011-03-05 16:00:07
Posted: 2011-04-26 | 09:34